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Review:Sushmita says:
I will not believe that a student was killed by one of the carrows as part of detention. I understand the punishment that they used crucio but I don't think Snape will allow them to start killing the students, specifically if all that are left now in Hogwarts are pure-bloods. I feel u need to revisit this chapter and just keep it at Neville being tortured by the Carrow. I like the part of Ginny learning enough to be able to help Neville. I'm pretty sure all the parents will demand their kids be sent back home if they start dying already. Its too hard for ppl to come back and read your chapter if its gets this brutal so early on in the story.

Author's Response: I respectfully disagree.

Throughout the HP series, we hear from multiple adult characters about the ferocity of the Second Wizarding War during the rise of Voldemort. Harry's parents were murdered at twenty years old, and the remaining Marauders remark on Marlene McKinnon's family being "blown up" (presumably including Marlene, at the time a classmate of James, Lily, and company's) as a result of working for "the good guys".

We know that Death Eaters are proponents of torture and cruelty, who blindly worship Voldemort and have little care for anything else in the world. We know that Fenrir Greyback had no problem maiming Bill, also around twenty, and that Bellatrix tortured Neville's parents into insanity in their early twenties. We've seen Death Eaters kill and maim and torture with little emotion.

The Carrows were never introduced as some of the more conflicted, "grey area" Death Eaters, like Narcissa and Lucius. In fact, they are characterized in the DH as intentionally cruel human beings that take joy in punishing and torturing Hogwarts' students. I don't find it hard to believe their killing a student in what they perceive to be the second (and successful) coming of Voldemort rising to ultimate power for one moment.

But it seems like more of your argument may stem from your belief that Snape would never let students die at the hands of Death Eaters. Recall, however, that Snape is playing the most dangerous, and longest con that anyone has ever played before. I agree that, normally, Snape would find ways to prevent this from happening. However, his mission is too important, too vital to ultimately defeating Voldemort to risk blowing his cover (particularly when many Death Eaters are already doubtful of his allegiance to the Dark Lord). Snape's hold on Hogwarts hangs by a frayed thread throughout DH.

Furthermore, remember that this story is from Ginny's perspective. We have no way of knowing what's going on in the rest of the castle. We don't know how many student deaths Snape has managed to prevent before this one takes place. We don't know how many detentions and punishments he has intercepted until now. Perhaps he was in the dungeons preventing another student's mind from being broken by the other Carrow sibling at the same time as this horrible incident occurred. This is in keeping with one of the overarching themes of HP and this story; the futility of war. No matter how hard Harry tries to keep everyone safe, there are always things (or people) that slip through the cracks. That's one of the most heartbreaking things about needless conflict and war.

And yes, the parents of the deceased child are outraged. Their friends, who have their own children at Hogwarts are outraged. Together, they plan to storm the castle and demand to retrieve their children, to free them from the dangers and denounce Snape and the Carrows and Voldemort and all of it. But... what if, in retaliation, more children are killed? What if it's their children? What if they are inadvertently responsible for the death of their neighbour's child? Their best friend's child? ...do you see the problem?

This story is not set in the happy days of Hogwarts. It is set during (arguably) the largest Wizarding War to date. This is what Ginny keeps trying to impress upon her peers.

This might not have a happy ending. It certainly doesn't have a happy middle.


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