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Review:Hogwarts27 says:
Another lovely chapter and a thoroughly enjoyable read! I'm glad you showed how Salazar got to be the way he was in canon. I also meant to mention in my earlier reviews that I really like the names you've picked for some of your characters - the nice old-fashioned sounding ones.

There were a couple of small things I noticed as I've been reading, but please don't take it as criticism - it's just an observation.

One of the things I loved about Chapter 1 was the old-fashioned wording in the narrative and dialogue. But since then, you've sometimes lapsed into more casual story-telling with modern language slipping into the narrative and dialog - LOL, I'm sure they didn't use expressions like 'that's great' or dark stuff' in medieval times. Then other times you get back into the old-fashioned word flow again, which really adds to the charm of the story. Not that it's a big deal. It certainly doesn't get in the way. I'm just pointing it out.

And one other little thing about the historic era - and no I'm not a history expert, but I noticed this anyway. When Maeve sneaks off to be with Salazar, she thinks to herself there's nothing her father can really do about it anyway. But that's probably not accurate for medieval times when men had all the power and women had virtually no rights. A medieval wife or daughter who disobeyed would likely have been harshly disciplined by a husband or father who discovered it, so I don't think Maeve would have disobeyed him so lightly. The Church also had a lot of power in medieval times, so a woman probably wouldn't risk doing anything that would be considered immoral like running off alone with a boy. I'm sure daughters were strictly chaperoned and never left alone with a young man. After all, it would ruin a young woman's chance of marriage if she didn't conduct herself properly around men, or was suspected not to be chaste. And even a suitor would likely refuse to marry a girl if she conducted herself too freely with him. No girl in those days would want to risk that, because marriage was essential to women, as they didn't work to support themselves and depended on their husbands to provide. So young couples wouldn't have been running off alone together in those days, certainly not muggles. Anyway, it's just something I noticed and happened to think about when I read those parts. Again, not a big deal. Just an observation.

I liked the part with Salazar and the snake. If there was anything demonic suspected, medieval folks would have steered away, so it was believable that Maeve would reject him even when they'd been trying so hard to reconcile their differences. On the other hand, anything connected with magic was considered the devil's work in those days, so muggles probably wouldn't have associated with anyone suspected of being a witch or wizard the way they do in this story - oops, just thought of that, but it doesn't really matter. I'm enjoying this story a lot!

Author's Response: Hi there! Wow, what a thorough review! I'm glad you've liked Salazar's POV, and the names of the minor characters.

I'm not surprised you pointed out the dialogue, I know that's my weak point in writing this story, it just doesn't come very naturally to me. Wow did I really say "dark stuff"? *facepalm* yep I'm definitely going to have to re-read through this whole thing and edit like all the dialogue haha.

Ok, as for the historic stuff: I love that you went into such detail about this, because I enjoy talking about it :P I did do a fair bit of research about women in the tenth century actually, and this is what I deduced: Christianity had not gained a foothold everywhere by the 900's, and I think medieval Christianity was a main reason for the lack of women's power in society. Before that was a lot of paganism, and women had a bit more freedom then - and so the Church wasn't quite as powerful as it would have been, say, two hundred years later. I think in the time period of this story there was equal influence from the church and from the traditional ways. You're probably right about Maeve being inappropriate to disobey her father and run off with Salazar - church or not, she'd be quite disrespectful to do that.

And about magic in those days... witch burnings did not start until the 14th century or so, and even then weren't bad until the 17th century when they really took off, so I figured that before that, things were a little calmer.

...And I'm going to stop before this begins to sound like a dissertation. If you want any more historical and social debate though, totally send me a PM on the forums :D But thank you so much for this review! I really appreciate that you took the time to point those things out, and I'm glad you are still enjoying the story! ♥


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