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Leonore

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#1 Leonore

 
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Posted 18 April 2014 - 11:21 AM

Hello and welcome to my MTA! If you're here, chances are you've read at least some of my stories. You have questions? Ask away! Noticing my review responses ending up longer than the reviews themselves, I thought maybe I should get myself a place where I can explain my work to my heart's content!  :yahoo:

 

If you HAVEN'T read any of my work, my author's page is linked in my sig. Plenty of one-shots, so don't worry about not having time to start any more novels... :p


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#2 -BookDinosaur-

 
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Posted 18 April 2014 - 11:54 AM

Hey there! I love a new MTA to post in. :)

1. What gives you inspiration to write about such minor characters, such as Boderick Bode or the basilisk?

2. Do you prefer writing oneshots or multi-chaptered works?

3. How would you describe your writing style in one word?

4. Is there one genre/character/era/etc. you can't see yourself writing?

5. In Rite of Spring, what inspired you to make it creepy and supernatural instead of a fluffy Easter oneshot?

6. You have a short story collection about the worst memories of four women and the best memories - what got you to write such complete opposites?

7. Tea or coffee? (Yes, there is a correct answer for this.)

 

Enjoy! :p


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#3 Leonore

 
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Posted 18 April 2014 - 01:57 PM

Yay! First questions! :yahoo:

 

1. What gives you inspiration to write about such minor characters, such as Boderick Bode or the basilisk?

Um... I like writing minor characters because there's so much more freedom - there are events we know happened but know next to nothing about. All kinds of things spark plunnies - sometimes I'm just doing research for other stories and spot a name, sometimes a comment in a review gets me thinking. Often it's for challenges, and I think of someone who fits - Broderick Bode I found because I saw two challenges (last 24 hours and St Mungo's) and thought "they would go well together", then realised that we had one person who definitely DID die in St Mungo's - Bode (otherwise I'd have found another minor character and had them have an accident). So he just fitted the situation beautifully. The basilisk I wrote because I'd just been writing a bit in True Lion about Voldemort returning to the Chamber of Secrets and finding the remains of Slytherin's basilisk, so she was on my mind when I saw the non-human challenge. My most obscure character was probably Nobby Leach for the History of the Wizarding World challenge. Finding him was something like: history - minister for magic (that was a suggestion in the topic) - HP wiki list of ministers - nice obscure one - ooh, he looks interesting! I then proceeded to write five chapters of wizarding politics based around him!

2. Do you prefer writing oneshots or multi-chaptered works?

One-shots! Short stories are OK, but whenever I do anything longer I get halfway then realise it has next to no plot and get stuck. I also get a bit bored, I'm sorry to say. I like one-shots because I can take a moment from canon and I have all the plot I need to develop. What I always want to do is make people really feel the character, and I can't keep up the real intensity I like for multiple chapters

3. How would you describe your writing style in one word?

Impulsive (I get an idea, I start writing and the words appear on the page. Plunnies can come from anything, at any moment.)

4. Is there one genre/character/era/etc. you can't see yourself writing?

I've thought so before, but I always seem to end up writing it (certainly considering next-gen). Right now, romance is a no. At least not straight romance - a little bit on the side, maybe. I've always thought no golden trio, but then they feature quite strongly in my next-gen plan. Oh! No The head boy and girl do NOT share a dormitory (sorry Dramione fans). And if there are thousands of it already out there I'm unlikely to write my own version.

5. In Rite of Spring, what inspired you to make it creepy and supernatural instead of a fluffy Easter oneshot?

Fluffy? Have you READ my work? I stared at all the prompts for a few minutes and considered each. Well, I had no ideas for the first two prompts but the last one was just begging to be written - and honestly, how is that quote not creepy? So either supernatural or psychological thriller. Limit too short for psychological, so straight supernatural horror. It was a bit of an experiment, my first foray out of third person past tense, but I was going to play to my strengths and make it dark. Plus I hadn't done horror like this, just angst, and I decided it would be fun. I keep trying new things, but I can't think of ideas for fluff. Personally, I want to really affect people, whether that's by creeping them out or making them cry (I'm evil like that :devil: ). I also like being different. The plot itself? Inspired by Stravinsky's ballet of the same name.

6. You have a short story collection about the worst memories of four women and the best memories - what got you to write such complete opposites?

Of course I wrote Patronus first because of - you guessed it - a challenge. Then something made me think it would be quite fun to write a collection. I think it was actually right back writing Umbridge's chapter I came up with the idea of doing the other side - I was thinking about how she ended up as she did and came up with the idea that she was bullied. Well perhaps what I like the most is taking an unpopular character or what seems like an unjustifiable reaction and making the reader sympathise. Then because the collection was called Patronus I decided to make another collection of the opposites - Dementor. Writing each "happiest memory", being me I started thinking about the worst memory - Luna and Dolores especially as their happiest memories actually hinted at their worst memories. When I write something about a character, it often sparks all kinds of other ideas in my head. Dementor began as me wanting to make people relate to Dolores, then I thought it would be neat to do the other side of the whole collection. I realised the context would be kind of similar to Bitten, my first ever one-shot (Remus Lupin), which I still consider my best work and which just came naturally to me - I liked the idea of doing more like that.

7. Tea or coffee? (Yes, there is a correct answer for this.)

Neither. *ducks* I don't like the taste of tea at all and I've seen studies on what caffeine does to your brain, plus I've never really had a reason to try coffee. Hot chocolate occasionally, if I'm really cold, but mostly just water.

 

Thanks Emily! Having great fun answering questions, if it is a bit difficult to figure out what to say. Keep them coming! :D


Edited by Leonore, 18 April 2014 - 02:01 PM.

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#4 MargaretLane

 
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Posted 19 April 2014 - 11:24 AM

1. Which is your favourite of your stories?

2. You write about a lot of minor characters, some of whom are practically OCs. Do you have any you particularly enjoyed developing?

3. Do you prefer writing about characters like Nobby Leach and Bode, who you have a lot of freedom to develop as you like or characters like Remus and Umbridge, where there is a canon personality already in place?

4. Have you any other characters you are anxious to write about?

5. Do you do much research before writing a story?


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#5 Leonore

 
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Posted 19 April 2014 - 03:20 PM

Ooh, more questions to answer!

 

1. Which is your favourite of your stories?

I think I'd have to say Bitten (don't tell my the others...) It was my first one-shot and it just came to me one day so I sat down and wrote it in one evening (all 6000 words!). I got pretty emotional writing it and it just felt kind of special - especially when Lyall's watching his motionless son through the glass and thinking about how it's his fault and he could have been quicker.

2. You write about a lot of minor characters, some of whom are practically OCs. Do you have any you particularly enjoyed developing?

Igor Karkaroff in Waves Against The Rocks was really interesting because there was so much to develop -  he chose to be a Death Eater, so he wasn't entirely a victim. When he first joined up he was looking for power and he was a supporter of wizarding supremacy, and being young he decided to take action. He keeps justifying his actions to each other, he's convinced himself he was betrayed, and of course he's haunted by Azkaban. He's a despicable person, but he sees himself as a victim.

3. Do you prefer writing about characters like Nobby Leach and Bode, who you have a lot of freedom to develop as you like or characters like Remus and Umbridge, where there is a canon personality already in place?

I like to have something to work from, and I prefer working with a bit more detail but also freedom - so we know what Remus is like as an adult, but I wrote him as a six-year-old. The same with Umbridge, plus I found in canon she's so one-dimensional that there's still a lot of freedom. I can usually get a picture of character from events - Nobby Leach must have been ambitious and determined to fight against prejudice as he did, and very dedicated to not give up. I do find it easier when I have a character, but I get that from events more than how they're portrayed in the books.

4. Have you any other characters you are anxious to write about?

Not right now, actually. I've been thinking about Ollivander a bit but I can't really get a picture of him or a plot. Ariana maybe - I started one but it didn't work, so maybe when I think of a suitable plot - I think she could be really interesting to write. And believe it or not I'm considering post-war Golden Trio (especially Harry) because I think peace-time and growing up would change them a lot. Plus Rowena, through house pride, but I can't get a grip on her character.

5. Do you do much research before writing a story?

It varies - most of my research is done as I go along. I find my character, read their HP wiki entry, then start writing and check details as they come up. For longer stories I look for other characters around at the same time who might play a part in the story and find out about them. But not much beforehand, mostly research as I go along.


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#6 BellaLestrange87

 
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Posted 06 September 2014 - 09:59 AM

I just reviewed Rainfall for the Blue vs. Bronze review battle, so I thought I would drop by and ask you some questions :bye:

 

1. What made you decide to write about a blind Hugo?

2. How did you come up with his characterization?

3. Do you listen to music when you write? If you do, what music?

4. Is it hard writing from the point of view of a blind character? Your writing doesn't seem limited at all.

 

Have fun answering!


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#7 Leonore

 
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Posted 06 September 2014 - 10:57 AM

Hi!  :bye: I saw your review, and I'm really happy you're interested in the story! These are lovely questions, thank you.  :hug:

 

 

1. What made you decide to write about a blind Hugo?

 

First of all, I always like to write things that are a bit different, exploring more complex issues and trying things I haven't seen in fics before. I got the idea for Rainfall whilst on a train. A blind man was helped on board by a station attendant and then left, and I saw him struggle to find an empty seat. I just saw the helpless look on his face as he tried to figure out whether seats were empty or not, afraid of accidentally prodding another passenger or anything. I took him to a free seat and on the train journey it struck me how fascinating it would be to write from the POV of someone in that kind of situation. I was already thinking about writing a next-gen, and I had a lot of the more minor features already in my head (the main plot was originally going to focus on "hidden" disabilities - mental disorders, but I was struggling to form a story out of that), then the idea of having Hugo blind gave me the main ingredient of the story. Why Hugo? Because I wanted it to be one of the next-gen kids and he fitted perfectly - partly with the reasons for his blindness being those mentioned in the chapter you just reviewed. It felt realistic to me, and when I reread the epilogue of Deathly Hallows I couldn't even see anything to prove that he wasn't blind.

 

 

2. How did you come up with his characterization?

 

He just sort of developed himself, really. I guess one of my starting points is that characters have to be flawed, have to be real and able to develop as people. When I started, I had this basic outline - he's blind, obviously, and he hates people fussing over him because he thinks it's because he's blind. Because he's more reliant on other people, he really wants to be independent. Beyond that, he's pretty emotional and sensitive to his surroundings and other people. He gets very moody sometimes - a lot of bitterness and self-hate, and hate against the world in general - and at other times he might be full of life or else pretty spiritual. When he's in the mood, he enjoys pointing out technicalities and being awkward for the sake of it. He's very sensitive about his blindness, of course. Really... I don't think about all those things when I create a character. I thought "9-year-old boy, blind" and just thought about what his logical reactions to things might be . And he developed himself into the Hugo you see now. I just know how he thinks, how he reacts to things, how he talks. I couldn't imagine him any other way.

 

 

3. Do you listen to music when you write? If you do, what music?

 

I very rarely listen to music when I write. I usually end up getting distracted by it. If I do listen to music whilst writing, it has to be instrumental, because otherwise I find myself listening to the words. When writing the chapter when Hugo's at the concert, I was actually listening to the pieces he was listening to. My main music listening, though, takes place before writing or in breaks. The section I'm working on now is pretty heartbreaking, and the right kind of music gets me into the mood for it. I discovered the music of Lianna Klassen a little while ago and fell in love with it (particularly her album "The Guest"), and that really does put me in the mood for my current chapters. I also do various searches including the word "harp" on Spotify, not least to help with some of the descriptions for when Hugo's playing.

 

 

4. Is it hard writing from the point of view of a blind character? Your writing doesn't seem limited at all.

 

Thank you! That's a relief to hear! It is hard, in some places more often than others. You know all the writing tips saying "use all senses"? I can't use visual descriptions, unless someone like Lily's actually describing the things to Hugo. It's a style I've got into now as I've written a lot (I'm actually working on chapter 22, although only 8 are up so far) and it's very... "eye-opening" wouldn't quite be the right word. Sometimes, when I'm not doing anything else, I close my eyes and try to make a picture of my surroundings through sound and scent and touch. It's an excellent exercise which I would recommend, by the way, as you actually find ways to put into words things which you never normally consider. I'm struggling a bit at the moment because I'm trying to get across emotions and explain what's going on and I keep coming up with little lines which fit perfectly before realising they're visual description and not the kind of thing Hugo is able to notice. I'm really proud of some of the descriptive scenes, because despite the limitations of the POV I feel like I've really managed to create a picture. I can see it doing wonders for my descriptions in general.

 

And while in many ways it's limiting, it also creates opportunities I wouldn't have with a sighted character. It's a unique situation. Hugo's learnt to cope in a way normal 9/10-year-olds wouldn't have to, and all he's been through gives him a bit of a different perspective on the world. I was considering switching POV (perhaps to Lily) for the sequel, because of the limitations of writing from Hugo's POV, but I've decided to stick with him because a) it fits the plot I have planned, and b) I'd be losing what makes the story special to me.

 

 

Thanks again! I did have great fun answering! Hope you enjoy the rest of the story! :D


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