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#31 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:19 PM

Debra!  :D  Thank you again for those wonderful reviews on Out of Time

 

1. Out of Time is one of the most complex stories I have ever read, both in characterization and in plot handling. How did you go about writing it to not utterly confuse yourself? Or did it confuse you?

First of all, thank you for those compliments!  I wrote this story to test-drive an OF time travel plot, and I never thought it would turn out so well!  For some reason, the timeline never confused me, which, now that I think about it, is a strange thing because the last time I tried writing time travel in The Fires Within, I became so confused that the plot fell apart.  But for Out of Time, I'd planned the story with greater care, and even though I made changes to this plan - such as in the second-to-last chapter - they had no effect on the timeline.  In my plan, I wrote down each of the dates, based on the age that I wanted Moody to be - 70, mid-40s, just short of 20, and 10 - then I structured Lily's story around those dates 

 

2. Did you do any particular research for it?

Yes, quite a bit.  I kept looking up little things like the agriculture and landscape of the Lake District, the dates of major bombings in WWII London, the types of magical items that Alastor Moody might possess, and information about Moody himself, from his speech patterns to any hints to his history that have appeared in the books or elsewhere.  I'm becoming more obsessed with details in my stories.  XD

 

3. Did you plan it? The plot I mean.

It was a new experience to plan things out in advance, not just the timeline, but also the various clues that lead to the story's revelation, including the wedding ring and the portrait.  I wasn't sure how obvious to make these clues, and I often worried that readers would figure out the plot too soon - a couple did, though not with 100% certainty, so I was safe.  :p  Having a set plan - with some wiggle room, of course - made a big difference in getting me to update faster.  I didn't have to sit back and think about what I wanted to happen next and how it would affect the story. 

 

4. One thing I've noticed about many of your original characters is that you have a very distinct voice for each. What do you think is the secret of creating an OC that people can easily relate to up to the point of considering them canon (when writing fanfiction, but not only)? I mean, do you follow any given process when creating new characters?

Oooh, this is a good question!  It's wonderful to hear this about my characters!  It's a challenge to make them sound different because there's only so much you can do with dialect and language, and many of my main characters share similar traits, so sometimes I worry that they're all really the same person, just caught up in different plots. :ninja:  I gave up writing character bibles and filling character forms years ago, but I'll try to describe what I do with characters.

 

A character has to fit into their world.  Even if they're alienated from it or actively rebelling against it, they still have to come from it, somehow - they will always have these little habits or ways of thinking that can only come from existing in that world.  I often design my characters based on the kind of story I'm writing, and as the story continues, the character grows - eventually, they come to influence the plot.  That's what is key for me: that plot and character are interconnected, each contributing to the development of the other, and both are a part of the world in which they exist, be it Rowling's Magical World or an original setting. 


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#32 patronus_charm

 
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Posted 14 May 2013 - 07:44 PM

As I'm getting down to the final chapters of This Longing I thought it would be a good idea to come and pay another visit!

 

As This Longing is a prequel of sorts to The Fires Within, will this be your last foray into Grimm's world or is there going to be more? (Please say there's more :D)

 

Speaking of endings, how many chapters are there left of This Longing?

 

I spotted quite a few WIPs on your page, which I will get round to reading soon, but I was wondering do you have a favourite among them? If so, which one is it and why?

 

Will you ever write an insanely fluffy story, or is that genre firmly off limits for you?

 

I heard that you have a Snape story coming up, are spoilers available for that or do I have to wait and see?

 

I think I'm done for now, but I'll probably be back again :)


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#33 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 15 May 2013 - 04:10 AM

Thank you for the questions! It's been exciting to go through your reviews because you've helped me figure out how to best resolve a few loose ends. :D
 
As This Longing is a prequel of sorts to The Fires Within, will this be your last foray into Grimm's world or is there going to be more? (Please say there's more :D)
With the three one-shots, I've technically already "completed" Grimm's story. After the epilogue to This Longing, there will be little more to say that isn't included in the one-shots. I've placed myself in the awkward position of writing a novel-length prequel to a series of short stories, so it's hard to say whether there is actually room for more. Grimm is a great character to write, and he's certain to find his way into my original fiction, if that's any consolation. :)
 
Speaking of endings, how many chapters are there left of This Longing?
2 full chapters in addition to the epilogue. My plan was to only write 20 chapters for this story, but somehow it's drifted beyond that. :p
 
I spotted quite a few WIPs on your page, which I will get round to reading soon, but I was wondering do you have a favourite among them? If so, which one is it and why?
Of the WIPs? *makes a face* I love writing them all and am constantly annoyed by them all, but there's a reason why, even after 7 years, I still go back to Black Sands. The elements of that story - adventure, mystery, archaeology - are things I love, then to add the history of Egypt (both ancient and modern), and a female protagonist I've gone from hating to adoring... it's just a good combination of things for me.
 
Will you ever write an insanely fluffy story, or is that genre firmly off limits for you?
Whenever I try to write fluff, it becomes dark and introspective, or death imagery pops in.  *headdesk*  I can do happy, but I just can't understand fluff.  For some reason, my belief is that stories need a struggle - the character has to be struggling to get something, do something, be something - but in fluff, where is that?  It's a sweet story about nice things, and it does nothing to inspire me.  :(
 
I heard that you have a Snape story coming up, are spoilers available for that or do I have to wait and see?

It's funny that you ask because I finally came up with the structure for this story today.  It takes place before Snape overhears the prophecy and shows the kind of work he did as a Death Eater - it would be very dark and somewhat violent.  I also have an idea to make it a two-parter, where the second part would depict his reaction after he realizes how Voldemort has interpreted the prophecy, exploring the boundary between selfless and selfish love.  He isn't going to come out in a positive light - I want to show more of his problematic side.  (Hopefully this doesn't reveal too much :p)


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#34 ~chocolate

 
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Posted 28 May 2013 - 12:35 AM

Hi Susan! I'm a bit nervous but I've got some questions if you don't mind answering:

 

1. What next generation character do you like better: Rose or Lily II?

 

2. Do you prefer James/Lily or Lily/Severus and why?

 

3. If you could cast anyone as teenage Rose other than Karen Gillan, who would it be?


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#35 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 09 June 2013 - 12:48 AM

These are great questions! Thank you for asking them - and don't be nervous about asking me stuff. I'm very happy to answer questions, and it's great to find another TDAer here at HPFF. :happy:
 
1. What next generation character do you like better: Rose or Lily II?
Overall, Rose is the one I like best because it's interesting to see what kind of daughter Hermione and Ron would have had - the contrast in their personalities is fun to bring out when writing Rose. I've had to purposely write Lily in order to explore the potential of her character, while with Rose, writing about her feels more natural for some reason.
 
2. Do you prefer James/Lily or Lily/Severus and why?
I don't prefer one over the other. Lily/Severus is suffused with sadness and angst, which is why I'm more drawn toward writing it. Yet I also enjoy writing James/Lily and pushing the boundaries of what can be done with that relationship. Oddly enough, I'm not interested in the romance aspect of these two ships
 
3. If you could cast anyone as teenage Rose other than Karen Gillan, who would it be?
This is a tough one, since I've used Karen since I started writing about Rose. Ruth Wilson makes for a great darker Rose, and Lily Collins would work nicely too. :)
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#36 Debra20

 
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Posted 18 July 2013 - 12:09 AM

Hello Violet. Here with some curiosities I have ;)

 

1. Ok, so the more I read your stories, the more I fall in love with your descriptions. I think you've taken description to the rank of art. How do you do it? Did you put a lot of effort into honing this skill?

 

2. Your Author's Page is filled with great stories, but what's your personal favourite? You know, your 'baby' :)

 

3. Describe your writing style in 5 words please :D

 

4. What's the most complicated story you've ever written? The one that required the most attention, most dedication, research?


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#37 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:18 AM

Hello Debra! Thank you for the questions - hopefully I'll be able to come up with slightly-satisfying answers. :ninja:

 

1. Ok, so the more I read your stories, the more I fall in love with your descriptions. I think you've taken description to the rank of art. How do you do it? Did you put a lot of effort into honing this skill?

Wow, thank you for that compliment!  I'm glad to hear that you like the descriptions so much. At times I wonder whether they are too long and thus slow down the plot, but I love writing them - it's as much about immersing myself in the story as it is giving readers the chance to do the same. A lot of what I've learned about description-writing comes from all the reading I've done, seeing what's effective and what isn't - what brings the world of the story to life is the most important, taking into account the five senses and creating an atmosphere with as strong a presence as the characters themselves.

 

How does this become an art, though? I tend to rely a lot on figurative language - metaphors, similes, personification - as well as allusions to other things I've read, and I run with these things as far as I can.  What I want to create above all else is an atmosphere, and the kind of atmosphere I want changes what kind of words and images I associate with it.  I don't know if this answers your question at all.  :/

 

2. Your Author's Page is filled with great stories, but what's your personal favourite? You know, your 'baby' :)

Out of Time because it's complete and I still like it even after more than a year. The way the story worked out pleasantly surprised me made me ridiculously happy because I didn't expect that plot to actually work, nor did I think that I could fall so deeply into the writing of a story as I did with this one. 

 

3. Describe your writing style in 5 words please :D

You're not going to like this.  :p   Depressing, descriptive, irreverent, complicated, wordy. 

 

4. What's the most complicated story you've ever written? The one that required the most attention, most dedication, research?

Right now, it's the three novel-length WIPs that I'm working on, each of which require a good bit of dedication and an awful lot of research (word of warning - do not write more than one period piece at a time).  With This Longing, most of the problem is keeping within the limitations of canon, including a timeline that I only learned too late doesn't fit the plot I had in mind.  With Black Sands, I've been trying to research 1920's Egypt as well as Ancient Egypt, and now I'm also adding references to the Cult of Isis while trying to bring the plot under control. Pride & Pestilence is also research-heavy with the added challenge of writing in a Regency style. It's like nothing I've done before. Between these three stories, I'm going to go insane.  Yet I keep writing them. :sorry:


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#38 Debra20

 
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Posted 18 September 2013 - 06:30 PM

Hey! It's me again. Hope you're not getting tired of seeing me poking around  :shy: Today is mystery question day for me, so naturally you're the one I thought about first. I have had a Next Gen mystery Idea, but since this genre is quite new to me, I may need a bit of steering

 

1. It's already common knowledge that you absolutely adore mystery stories/novels/anything-having-to-do-with-mystery. Apart from the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories and Agatha Christie's work, do you have any other novel recommendations you found worth reading?

 

2. What about fanfics here on HPFF? I imagine you must have read quite a few

 

3. How do you go around organizing the plot for a mystery story? Is the process different than how you usually plan?

 

4. I think a great mystery story relies on well....mystery. How do you keep this always present? How do you write without revealing too much, or make the villain reveal predictable, etc? Do you have to know more about the plot than normally?

 

5. After having read so much in this genre, what do you think are the key ingredients of a good mystery/crime solving story that keeps the reader interested?

 

6. What about the characters? I am a believer that characters drive the plot, not the other way around, so is there any specific way characters should act in these type of stories?

 

I think that's all for now, but I might come back if that's okai with you!


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#39 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 19 September 2013 - 02:09 AM

It's lovely to hear from you again!  It's actually a compliment that you think I know things about the mystery genre. XD It's my favourite one to read, but I've found it more challenging to write because it requires a more intricate plot and attention to detail than other genres. I'll do my best to answer your questions - I've love to hear more about your plot bunny too!

 

1. It's already common knowledge that you absolutely adore mystery stories/novels/anything-having-to-do-with-mystery. Apart from the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories and Agatha Christie's work, do you have any other novel recommendations you found worth reading?

Where to start? For an alternative to Christie, I'd suggest Dorothy L. Sayers, who was one of the first authors to take more of a psychological, rather than plot-based, approach to the detective story. After that, I definitely recommend P. D. James (The Murder Room and The Lighthouse are two of her best more recent novels, and An Unsuitable Job for a Woman is always a worthy read) as well as Martha Grimes (The Grave Maurice and The Winds of Change are excellent, with their combination of heavy drama and lighter humour). For historical-type mysteries, Anne Perry writes some hard-core Victorian crime novels while Lindsey Davis writes hilarious Roman mysteries. Then there's also two series of published Sherlock Holmes fanfiction that I recommend: Laurie R. King's series starting with The Beekeeper's Apprentice and Carole Nelson Douglas's Irene Adler novels.  And watch Inspector Morse - probably the best detective series ever.

 

2. What about fanfics here on HPFF? I imagine you must have read quite a few.

They're harder to find on HPFF, especially in completed form - I'll pick some out from my favourites list. :)

- Majikat's The Raven's Ring (15+) is an homage to film noir and American hard-boiled detectives. 

- The Solution is Murder (M) from an ancient collaboration, but still a very good mystery

- Cassius Alcinder's Behind the Curtain (15+) has some great mystery-esque elements

- I still have to read TenthWeasley's Bad Blood (M), but I assume that it's an excellent mystery story

 

3. How do you go around organizing the plot for a mystery story? Is the process different than how you usually plan?

It helps to plan, to know your clues and how you'll use them, then whether you want to focus wholly on plot, or also include character development/subplot. The characterization of your detective is crucial because, depending on the type of mystery you're writing - hard-boiled, cozy, amateur, police procedural - there's always the question of are the believable as detectives? Can we trust them? If it's not their job, why do they feel the need to solve this crime? How does it affect them, if at all? A lot of it depends on the type of "crime" or problem that the protagonist has to solve - the harsher the crime, the more there is at stake for everyone involved, and you have to take that into account.

 

In terms of plotting, the trick is being able to foreshadow effectively without revealing too much - pay attention to little things, objects, facial expressions, reactions to certain words/actions. It might be a good idea to keep a list of clues as you go so that you don't forget anything - a few red herrings are useful, but you don't want to frustrate readers... too much.  

 

4. I think a great mystery story relies on well....mystery. How do you keep this always present? How do you write without revealing too much, or make the villain reveal predictable, etc? Do you have to know more about the plot than normally?

If it's a long novel, you will need some breaks from the mystery, but in a novella or short story, the mystery will almost always be in the foreground, the protagonist perhaps asking questions, thinking of possibilities, refusing to let it drop. So much about these questions depends on what kind of story you want to write. There are lots of mysteries that show the villain committing the crime, then the story is about the process of solving the mystery. Then there's Christie's Murder of Roger Ackroyd with the plot twist of all plot twists regarding the villain, where you'd never have expected it unless you were as sharp as M. Poirot. There are different types of "villains," obviously, some who commit the crime out of necessity, others who do so out of malice - mysteries tend to show that everyone is capable of crime - but one thing you do have to pay close attention to is motive. Why did they do it? And then there's the question of can it be proven? 

 

With the clues, be cryptic - mention something, but don't emphasize it. For example, in Out of Time, I took a risk in Chapter Four when Moody first says, "All those years. Most of my life. You knew everything" then later adds “Don’t come to conclusions ‘till you’ve all the evidence" - I thought for sure that readers would figure it out, but most reviewers didn't, and even those who did didn't believe it.  Use light strokes, be subtle.  A good mystery has to keep you strung along until the big reveal.

 

5. After having read so much in this genre, what do you think are the key ingredients of a good mystery/crime solving story that keeps the reader interested?

I know what I like, if that helps. Have a strongly written character for your detective - quirky, but not too quirky, more like interesting, with complex elements to their personality.  Make the characters, even the supporting ones, full-bodied people - this is my major criticism of Christie's novels, actually, that she tends to write types - who aren't predictable, and who actually make things more difficult for the detective.  One thing I've seen other people criticize mysteries for is poor pacing - make sure to have strong action scenes, as well as slower bits in between, either for subplot or old fashioned plodding. I love a good atmosphere, too - most mystery stories are very specific about historical moments and geographical spaces, so it's important to make that time and place come to life around the mystery and its characters. 

 

6. What about the characters? I am a believer that characters drive the plot, not the other way around, so is there any specific way characters should act in these type of stories?

This one is simple: like people.  Make them realistic, perhaps more realistic than you'd find in other genres. The more gruesome the crime, the uglier the response, the more anger will be unleashed, and the more unpredictable the characters become. Mystery stories are strange because, no matter how "cozy" they are, they still depict the darker side of humanity, so there should be something slightly raw present in the story. Something maybe even horrifying.

 

The real answer is: I have no idea. :p  Read a lot of mysteries, then do what feels right.

 


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#40 nott theodore

 
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Posted 22 September 2013 - 06:51 PM

Hi!  I've read a shamefully small amount of your stories but I assure you many of them are on my reading list right now!  Everything I've read of yours has been amazing though, and I wanted to stop by and ask a few questions (sorry if you've been asked these before) :)

 

1. Apart from JK Rowling, which author or poet do you think has most influenced your style of writing?

2. Have you always been a writer?

3. Do you strive to write stories that are original and different, or are the plots just ones that come into your head?

4. Out of all the characters you've written, who was your favourite?  Who was your least favourite?

5. Looking at your AP, you seem to have written almost every genre and era.  Are there any left that you'd like to challenge yourself to write in?

6. A lot of your stories fit in the other or next gen eras - what is it you like about them so much?  Are they your favourite eras to read as well as write?

 

And that's all for now :)  I look forward to reading your answers!


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#41 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:13 PM

Thank you! It means a lot that you're interested in reading more of my stories.   :happy:
 
1. Apart from JK Rowling, which author or poet do you think has most influenced your style of writing?
Which one... it's hard to decide which has most influenced my writing. I might have to say Charlotte Brontë because I remember how much reading Jane Eyre affected me when I was 13, and that was not long after I'd started to write. The influence is primarily visible in the Gothic atmosphere, the descriptions, and the characterization - mots of my main characters are, like Jane, young women wanting to make their own place in the world, often going against society's norms, and who want romance on their own terms. It's scary how much my novels and novellas are influenced by 19th century novelists like Jane Austen, the Brontes, George Eliot, and Mary Shelley. 
 
2. Have you always been a writer?
Haha, there was this story I wrote in grade 1 about spring and it won some award, so maybe "always" is the right term. :p  But I really got into it when I was about 12 or 13.
 
3. Do you strive to write stories that are original and different, or are the plots just ones that come into your head?
Both. Sometimes the plot hits me first, and I work from there. At other times, I just see an image or have one sentence come to mind. Regardless of which way inspiration happens, I do want to try to be original, or to at the very least take a convention/cliche and interpret it differently, like for instance the Head Boy and Head Girl romance, a popular ship like Rose/Scorpius, or the next-gen story. It's fun to play with cliches to see how little it takes to make them fresh again.
 
4. Out of all the characters you've written, who was your favourite?  Who was your least favourite?
 My favourite character to write is Minvera McGonagall. I wish I knew why - all I can think of is that I find her relateable and it doesn't take as much effort to see the world from her perspective. The character i really hated to write was Myrtle, especially since I wrote her in the first person, and her voice stuck with me for too long afterward. 
 
5. Looking at your AP, you seem to have written almost every genre and era.  Are there any left that you'd like to challenge yourself to write in?

Not really. The Hogwarts and Founders eras are the two I haven't done much for, but I'm not actually very interested in writing in those periods. It's hard with the Hogwarts era because there's so much overlap with the books, and that would make me uncomfortable - I need more freedom.  Yet with the Founders, not only is there to little to work from, but there's also the medieval period in general, and I don't have enough interest in that period to write about it in the way that it deserves.
 
6. A lot of your stories fit in the other or next gen eras - what is it you like about them so much?  Are they your favourite eras to read as well as write?

They're my favourite eras to read and write. Most of my favourite characters come from those eras - McGonagall, Moody, Rose, Teddy - and I find there's a lot that can be written about those periods. The Next Generation is open to so many different interpretations of the characters and what happens to them, and there's a large cast to work with, which means almost endless possibilities while still remaining within the bounds of canon. Then with the Other eras, what I love is the history - the 18th and 19th centuries, into the early 20th century are what I read about the most, so I feel comfortable writing about those periods, knowing that I can create the world of the story in a satisfying way. 

 

Great questions!  They really had me thinking. :D


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#42 UnluckyStar57

 
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Posted 14 December 2013 - 01:01 AM

Hello!  I just left a review on chapter 20 of "This Longing," and I thought I should stop by and ask you some questions! :)

 

1.  Who is your favorite protagonist that you've written to date?

2.  How did you come up with the idea for "The Fires Within?"  Was it random, or did inspiration strike you at a strange time?

3.  Did you always plan to write a prequel to TFW starring Minerva and Tiberius?  Did they end up having the same sort of relationship that you had envisioned when you originally wrote them?

4.  How much do you edit a chapter before submitting it?

5.  Do you write original fiction?

6.  Cats or dogs? ;)

7.  What is your favorite book currently?

8.  Did you read The Casual Vacancy?  Did you like it?

9.  Will you be sad when "This Longing" is finished, or are you ready to wrap it up and concentrate on other things?

 

That's all for now! :)


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#43 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:36 AM

Thank you for stopping by, and thank you for that review! It was just what I needed to help me with the current (final) chapter - there was a major loose end that I'd forgotten to tie up, and thankfully you'd mentioned it. :D

 

1.  Who is your favorite protagonist that you've written to date?

My favourite protagonist is still Minerva. She's by far the easiest and most interesting to write, even when I take a slightly different interpretation of her character. I'm not entirely sure why I like writing her so much, or why I'm generally so pleased with the way she turns out - there's just something about her that gives me the right kind of inspiration. :)

 

2.  How did you come up with the idea for "The Fires Within?"  Was it random, or did inspiration strike you at a strange time?

This requires thinking back a ways. :p It was a revised version of my very first (and very horrible) Potterverse fanfic, which was inspired by my frustrations with Sirius's death. I went on to write Fires out of a desire to write a Marauder-era story with both Snape and Sirius as love interests (it was 2005, that kind of thing was still acceptable back then), and somewhere along the way, I decided that the characters I actually enjoyed writing about were Grimm and Minerva. It's harder to remember where other aspects of the story came from, such as the parts about Mort, or why it suddenly became a time travel/alternate universe sort of story. 

 

3.  Did you always plan to write a prequel to TFW starring Minerva and Tiberius?  Did they end up having the same sort of relationship that you had envisioned when you originally wrote them?

No, it happened by accident. As I wrote more scenes with them together, I really liked the idea of giving them a story of their own. The one-shots came first, and as I began to build an entire history around them, I started to write the novel. There have been some changes to the details of their relationship, but the fundamental aspects of it have remained the same from the beginning. They were always fated to have an on-again/off-again relationship with a painful end, which I based on Minerva's characterization in the books. 

 

4.  How much do you edit a chapter before submitting it?

Because I edit as I write, it's hard to tell how much editing I actually do. I've come to do a lot of reading back over what I wrote the day before, checking for consistency and any rough patches - there are many times when I'll go back and add more detail or smooth out the transitions between scenes. I can be an obsessive editor, especially a few months/years after I've posted something - when I edited Out of Time once it was completed, I removed about 3000 words. *hides*

 

5.  Do you write original fiction?

Yes, though I tend to put it on the backburner while I'm finishing my fanfics. It's something I have to get into on a more serious level.

 

6.  Cats or dogs? ;)

Cats. I also like dogs, but cats hold the greater appeal to me. Living with one for 17 years had a lot to do with it. 

 

7.  What is your favorite book currently?

Do you mean favouritest of all favourite books? If you instead mean an outstanding book I've recently read, then I'd be torn between The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. They're both set in the Victorian period and are written in an incredibly unique style that I've found very inspiring. 

 

8.  Did you read The Casual Vacancy?  Did you like it?

I haven't read it yet. It's been set aside for a year, and instead I read The Cuckoo's Calling because, as a mystery novel, it's more my kind of book. That one I enjoyed quite a lot.

 

9.  Will you be sad when "This Longing" is finished, or are you ready to wrap it up and concentrate on other things?

Ending this novel after five years will be a wonderful accomplishment - I'll be too pleased that I finally did it to be sad. It's been stalled too many times and should have been finished two or three years ago, so finally wrapping it up, and ending it in a way that satisfies me, will be something to be proud of. It'll be nice to have more time to work on other projects. :)

 

Thank you for your questions! 


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#44 MissesWeasley123

 
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Posted 20 December 2013 - 09:33 PM

Hi! I haven't read much of your stories, but the ones I have read are amazing. If any of these questions have been asked(because I did a rather lousy scan haha), feel free to copy them, or if your answers have changed and stuff.

 

1. Who do you find easier to write with Lily, Sirius or James?

2. For over more than a decade, you've been writing stories on HPFF! Wow! Is there a particular one you hold very close to your heart? 

(I have a feeling the next ones been asked before, again feel free to copy+paste)

3. Do making graphics inspire you to write stories?

4. You've been here for a while, and have probably read a lot of stories from different eras. What stories appeal to you now? 

 

That's it for now Susan! Have fun answering!


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#45 Violet Gryfindor

 
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Posted 23 December 2013 - 11:46 PM

These sound like new questions to me. :D  Here goes it:

 

1. Who do you find easier to write with Lily, Sirius, or James?

It depends on the story and the way that I've chosen to approach their characters. When Sirius is the main character, it's harder to write James, but when James is the main character, he's fairly easy to write. Lily is generally more difficult to write, though I think I'm finally getting the hang of writing her. And by some strange whim of my muse, I find it easiest to write Sirius when it's a Sirius/Lily story. ><  Of the three, if I really must choose, I will say that James is the easiest character to write because it requires very little effort to find the right rhythm for his thoughts and words. He's more straight-forward, not struggling against prejudice like Lily or against his family like Sirius, and that makes him a refreshing character to write.

 

2. For over more than a decade, you've been writing stories on HPFF! Wow! Is there a particular one you hold very close to your heart?

It's been a long time!  Of my longer stories, I'm most proud of Out of Time (15+) and of my one-shots, I most like The Anatomy of Genius (15+). They build on themes and characterizations I've been working through for a while, and I'm pleased with how everything about them fit together. :)

 

3. Do making graphics inspire you to write stories?

It goes both ways. Sometimes I like to have the graphic before writing a story or a chapter because making it helps me sort out the themes and the atmosphere. But in that case, it's the making of the graphic that's important rather than the graphic itself. Looking at banners doesn't really spark inspiration for a new story, if that makes sense.

 

4. You've been here for a while, and have probably read a lot of stories from different eras. What stories appeal to you now? 

I've found that lately I'll enjoy reading anything that's well-written, where the author has clearly taken time to work with the characters and the world within the story. It's especially fun when an author does something different and new because, like you've said, I've read a lot of Potterverse fiction, and it's exciting when an author can find a refreshing way to write a particular character or era within JKR's world. Creativity is appealing. 

 

Thank you for stopping by with questions! :happy:


Edited by Violet Gryfindor, 23 December 2013 - 11:46 PM.

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